Friday, 18 May 2012

Movie Date: Big Fish

Art films. Had my sister not learnt that term in college, I would probably never have known about it. Okay, truth be told, I'm not even particularly sure what that means but I think it's a film that consists of so many symbolism that normal human minds can probably barely understand it. Luckily, I am not a normal human being. That being told, I haven't watched many art films in my years -- whoa, why am I writing like an old lady? -- but so far I have watched up to 3 art films that I have learnt to love and obsess with. One of them being this lovely piece directed by the most unique director I know, Tim Burton himself. Without further adieu, I present to you, Big Fish.

This film is, by far, the most ground-breaking, earth-shattering, whimsical and imaginative film I have ever watched. Well, of course it is, TIM BURTON MADE IT! Yes, I'm a Tim Burton freak, so sue me. What more am I supposed to say about this film? The cinematography is magnificent, the costume designs are top-notch and the plot is simple but very one-of-a-kind. I admire Ed Bloom to be so creative  and childlike. This film started my adoration toward Ewan McGregor and became one of the reasons why I decided to watch the remake of Moulin Rouge -- well, aside from Nicole Kidman's magnificent acting. Aside from him, we have got other amazing actors here too, such as Helena Bonham Carter, Marion Cotillard and Danny DeVito. The bonus points here are upon the artistic ones.

Ed Bloom was a father, who through his life told his life stories to people: his friends, family, his son's friends, everyone. Only...it wasn't what people would normally believe as life stories. His son, Will, believed it to be lies. He believed that was what his father was good at. Several years later, Ed got sick and his wife, Sarah, believed that it wouldn't be long for him. So Will came to visit them with his wife, Josephine. Now, Jo has never once heard Ed's life stories so Ed decided to tell her all about it. It began once upon a time when Ed lived in a small town somewhere. Near the town, there was a giant living in a cave. Everyone in the town was scared of him and asked someone who was brave enough to talk to him. Ed volunteered and went to the cave to find the giant who then became his friend. He came back a hero but then decided to venture the world with his new friend, Karl the Giant. They parted halfway because Ed wanted to go through the short but scary way and Karl didn't. He then found himself in a small but infinitely joyful place and met Jenny. Somehow, he then found himself in a circus and saw the love of his life, Sarah. The ringmaster, Amos, knew the girl but refused to give him any information about her unless he worked for him without financial payment for a long time. Being in love and everything, Ed agreed and earned his informations. After the promised time was up, he advanced to see Sarah in person and told her of his love. Long story short, they fell in love and got married.

Okaaaay, there is still a lot more to the story and what I've just shared is just a tip of the iceberg. Like I said, it's an art film and there are probably a gazillion of millions of symbolisms within it. The only you can figure it out is, simply, by watching it yourself. The most wondrously amazing part of this film is the fact that it collects all my favourite aspects and settings and putting them into one huge, creative film. There are circus, witch, make-believe place, reality, war and cabaret. Of course, let's all not forget about the giant. If I could say something, I'd say Ed Bloom has lived a magical and fulfilled life. To be so lucky as to experience all those adventures, well, one has to be thankful. Have a wondrous Friday and a magical weekend, everyone! Cheerio!

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